Thursday, October 18, 2007

Femoral Anterior Glide

If you ever experience a "pinching" sensation in the anterior portion of the hip(s) when squatting or pulling your knee to your chest when stretching your glutes, it could very likely be femoral anterior glide syndrome.

You see the glutes not only extend, abduct, and laterally rotate the hip joint but they also help control, what noted physical therapist Shirley Sahrmann calls, the path of instantaneous center of rotation of the femoral head. With normal functioning glute muscles, when the hip flexes the femoral head "glides" posteriorly to maintain its' position in the acetabulum. This posterior glide is caused by the pull of the glute muscles. If the glute muscles are inactive, the femoral head will glide forward upon hip flexion, impinging on the anterior joint structures of the hip joint.

The glute bridge is a simple exercise to use both as an assessment and activation drill for proper function of the glute muscles.

To perform the glute bridge, all you do is simply lie on your back and bend your knees to about 90 degrees. From there, set your feet about shoulder width apart and point your toes at the ceiling. Finally, raise your hips up off the ground, creating a straight line among your knees, hips, and shoulders. If you feel your hamstrings and/or low back and your butt muscles are soft you glutes are not doing their job. More often than not your abs will be relaxed as well.

Simply use this same drill to practice better glute activation. To improve your performance, practice posteriorly tilting your pelvis, tightening the abs, using them to pull up on the front of the pelvis, and squeezing your glutes prior to pushing your hips off the floor.

Use this exercise prior to your next training session. Proper glute activation can be to key to many problems along the kinetic chain.

AS

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hey, I beleive I have femoral glide as well, whenever I try to bring my knees anywhere close to my chest I feel a huge block, like tendon or bone...I feel some pain as well, but mainly I just can't get past that point, no matter how hard I try. I am going to start doing the glute bridge, and the pelvic tilting, and see how it goes.

I'm curious, did you have a feeling of weakness when trying to squat down, or bend over to pick stuff up? I can't squat anywhere near parellell with this condition, but when I try, I feel really weak.

Thanks a lot, I'll let you know how the exercises work:)

Mike said...

Thanks for the great information. This sounds exactly like what I have been dealing with for a few days after a poorly executed session of heavy squats.

I have exactly this type of pain and squeezing my glutes hard will all but eliminate it from most any motion or strain that causes it.

Now I think I know what I am dealing with and can take additional measures to help it heal and prevent its recurrence.

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