Monday, February 8, 2010

Movement Adherence

It's interesting... as our knowledge and understanding of the details of everything health and fitness get deeper, our country (or Western society as a whole) becomes more 'unhealthy' everyday.

Just take things from a medication perspective; what's one of the greatest challenges modern medicine faces? Prescription adherence.

A major problem is that exercise programs are essentially a prescription, leaving traditional exercise in the same category as medicine. Prescription adherence is, once again, the barrier to healthy movement.

As a culture, we need to find new and different solutions to our lack of movement, and prescriptions of programs are probably not the answer. Sure some may enjoy their 'programs' but collectively I am not so sure this is a sustainable option, and while a motivated few adhere, many are back to a sedentary life shortly after the New Year. It's important to find movement that one enjoys and that other's may enjoy as well. A person must find ways to work movement into everyday life. Just as Daniel Goleman's new book Ecological Intelligence suggests of ways to be better ecological consumers by knowing what we buy, where it came from and what it's effects are on the world; our society needs a shift in consciousness towards a "movement intelligence" in which we understand the importance of movement on our health and well-being, and have the consciousness to be able to make viable decisions within our current environment to attain greater frequency and diversity in our daily movements. Even more important is finding opportunities to get more play into our daily lives... however this is a great challenge, and would be for another discussion entirely, as the speed of life continues to increase and leisure time drops, leading to a decrease in community, which leads to a decline in all things health...

Its education and it needs to come from all places and people. Maybe something similar to what was done with smoking in our country? ... not sure, but we need to work on something...

Personally, as a strength and conditioning coach, I spend much of my time on searching and testing for the most effective ways to get the athletes better (speed, strength, power, agility, mobility, conditioning, nutrition, FIXING DYSFUNCTION... both 'physical' and 'psychological' and the interplay of those two) and what psychology is necessary to get this done... but many times this effort seems very futile. I mean coaches (both sport and S & C) want athletes to perform better and better, yet so many of today's athletes are or have been affected by our sedentary culture; a large decrease in free play outdoors and have learned awfully poor nutrition ("diet intelligence") habits growing up that we are now, as sport and performance coaches, we are to some extent working with 'unhealthy' people.

The thing I continually see is every expert coming out with more and more abstract information and products to fix this, improve that, when all they are is symptom fixes. Maybe we as coaches need to be redirecting our efforts to where it's needed. If we as coaches, athletes and fans really want to see the BETTER performances, the physical culture in our country needs to improve collectively. It may seem selfish on a sport level, but it's really not, because an improved physical culture (as you and I know) isn't just about improving one's physical fitness; it's about improving community, and the likelihood that people/children will be more active physically and socially, leading to better, healthier humans... which in the end, is a much improved canvas in which to create 'beautiful art' in whatever it is one may choose to pursue.

Move.
AS

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

quite interesting article. I would love to follow you on twitter. By the way, did you know that some chinese hacker had busted twitter yesterday again.

Anonymous said...

quite interesting read. I would love to follow you on twitter. By the way, did any one know that some chinese hacker had busted twitter yesterday again.

jleeger said...

How do you accomplish this? I think you're right!

Anonymous said...

Thought provoking article...it all boils down to the importance of balance-life balance. Teaching and coaching students to excel in their areas of expertise and interest yet always being cognizant of life balance.

Aaron Schwenzfeier said...

Not sure Josh, any suggestions?

Aaron Schwenzfeier said...

I know of some answers, but how is another matter.

jleeger said...

I think you have to look at your approach across a variety of factors.

You have to consider your athletes' personal backgrounds (physical/mental/emotional), their current issues/obligations, their individual cultural context, and the larger socio-cultural context.

Then you need to have an action plan for each of those factors...

Mike T Nelson said...

Preach on brother Aaron!

If you even look back at the Physical Culturist in the early 1900s up through even the 1950s, it is vastly different than today.

I think we need to go back to that lifestyle as a whole.

I find it interesting that I spend tons of my time reading neuroscience and nutrition research, but for training I read all the old strongman training books from the 1900s to 1930s even.

See ya here in MN very soon! Can't wait. The couch is reserved for you.

Rock on
Mike T Nelson PhD(c)
http://aaronschwenzfeier.blogspot.com/2010/02/less-work-more-play.html

Aaron Schwenzfeier said...

Thanks Mike!

True knowledge has been around for a long time... in many respects, I think we've really regressed.